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Morris Courses

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POLITICAL SCIENCE (POL)
Division of Social Sciences
Division of Social Sciences - Adm
 
POL 1101 - Introduction to Political Theory (E/CR)
(4.0 cr; spring, every year)
An introduction to key political concepts, questions, and ideologies through the writings of major thinkers of Western political theory and examination of contemporary debates about political life.



POL 1201 - American Government and Politics (E/CR)
(4.0 cr; fall, spring, every year)
Analysis of principles, organization, procedures, and powers of government in the United States. The federal system, national constitution, civil and political rights, party system; nature, structure, powers, and procedures of legislative, executive, and judicial departments of the national government.



POL 1401 - World Politics (IP)
(4.0 cr; fall, every year)
The contemporary international system, including nationalism, international political economy, foreign policy formulation, and global concerns such as the environment and conflict. North/South debate, definitions of power, the new world order, regional vs. global conflicts, and avenues of cooperation.



POL 1811 - War and Terrorism (IC)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM; fall, offered periodically)
An in-depth look into war and terrorism from 1914 to the present. Why do nations go to war? Why do people resort to terrorism? How do we prevent war/terrorism and preserve peace? Grapple with these questions and by the end of the term, acquire a rich, sophisticated understanding of war/terrorism and independent, critical thinking skills on international conflicts as a whole.



POL 1812 - Political, Social, and Military Conflict in American Film (IC)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM; fall, offered periodically)
An initial exploration of how motion pictures portray political, social, and military conflict in different periods of U.S. history. Students examine the images and messages of various kinds of political conflict as projected in American film and connect these portrayals to both the historical and social context of the times and to Hollywood's commercial objectives and elite biases. Specific topics include America's political founding and "civilizing" of the West, the civil rights movement and the struggle for LGBT rights, the politicized justice system, political leadership and corruption, war as heroic and tragic struggle, and dystopian political visions of America's future.



POL 1993 - Directed Study
(1.0 - 5.0 cr [max 10.0 cr]; Prereq-approved directed study form; fall, spring, every year)
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.



POL 2001 - Political Science Research Methods (SS)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-any 1xxx-level UMM Pol course, major or minor or #; fall, every year)
Students conceive and develop research questions and hypotheses; collect and critically review published research on their topic; analyze empirical evidence using statistical software; and write clearly, forcefully, and logically about their research. Examination of the philosophy and critiques of social-science methods.



POL 2993 - Directed Study
(1.0 - 5.0 cr [max 10.0 cr]; Prereq-approved directed study form; fall, spring, every year)
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.



POL 3201 - Legislative Process (SS)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1201 or #; Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 recommended; fall, odd academic years)
The internal organization of Congress and state legislatures, with emphasis on how rules and organizational changes affect the policy process. Topics include the evolution of the modern Congress and state legislatures, the committee system, the role of party leadership, and competing theories of congressional organization and behavior.



POL 3211 - The American Presidency (SS)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1201 or #; Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 recommended; fall, even academic years)
Traces the development of the American presidency over time. Major theories of presidential behavior and success are examined, as well as the literature on presidential popularity and executive/congressional relations.



POL 3221 - Judicial Politics (SS)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1201, 2001 or #; Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 recommended; fall, odd academic years)
Role of judges, police, attorneys, and interest groups within the political system, with analysis focusing on each as political actors. Areas of discretion in the legal system. Extra-legal predictors of judicial decision making and certiorari voting.



POL 3231 - Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (HDIV)
(4.0 cr; =[02137]; Prereq-1201 or #; spring, even academic years)
Examination of major Supreme Court opinions in the areas of freedom of religion, speech, assembly, and the press. Topics include the definitions of obscenity and libel, the Court's struggle with the right to privacy, and civil rights.



POL 3232 - Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers and Constraints (SS)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1201 or #; spring, odd academic years)
Examination of major Supreme Court opinions in the areas of congressional, executive, and judicial authority; nation-state relations, and economic liberties. Topics include substantive vs. procedural due process, the Takings Clause, the contract clause, and the powers to tax and spend.



POL 3233 - Civil Liberties and American Politics (E/CR)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1201; spring, even academic years)
Overview of the contested history of civil liberties in the United States. Topics include a discussion of the role of civil liberties in American political culture and the theoretical foundations of civil liberties as a concept. Survey of changing Supreme Court interpretations of the Bill of Rights and when and why its opinions on such subjects as freedom of speech have varied over time. Also examined are factors which have contributed to support and opposition to civil liberties throughout the history of the United States within the public as a whole.



POL 3234 - Race, Class, and Power: Social Movements and Interest Groups in U.S. Politics (HDIV)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1201; fall, even academic years)
A broad overview of social movements and interest groups. Using a case study approach, the class considers the question of when and why social movements and interest groups in American politics arise and what makes them more or less successful.



POL 3261 - State and Local Politics (SS)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1201 or #; spring, odd academic years)
Examination of the ways American democracy functions on the subnational level in states, rural communities, and urban centers. Analysis of principles, organizations, procedures, and functions of state and local government, both urban and rural, in the United States, with particular emphasis on comparing state politics and policy outcomes.



POL 3263 - Political Psychology (SS)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1201; Psy 1051 or # recommended; fall, odd academic years)
Examines the utility of concepts from personality and social psychology for conducting political analysis and understanding political behavior. Explores the role of the individual, group processes, and the political context in political decision making by both leaders and nonleaders.



POL 3272 - Making Environmental Public Policy (ENVT)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1101 or 1201 or 1401; spring, even academic years)
Exploration of the domestic and international politics of environmental and energy policy making. Focus on theoretical frameworks for policy making and political behaviors surrounding development of environmental and energy policies. Includes the applications of political dynamics and principles to specific areas of environmental and energy policy. Emphasis also given to politics of policy implementation.



POL 3351 - Ancient and Medieval Political Thought (HUM)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1101 or #; spring, odd academic years)
A survey of Western social and political thought from 5th century BCE through the 15th century.



POL 3352 - Modern Political Thought (HUM)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1101 or #; spring, even academic years)
A survey of Western social and political thought from the 16th through the 19th centuries.



POL 3354 - Political Ethics (E/CR)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1101 or #; fall, even academic years)
Examination of the strengths, weaknesses, and implications of moral arguments in political decision making. Ethical frameworks drawn from theoretical readings are applied to a range of contemporary U.S. case studies such as state use of violence, interrogation in times of war, governmental secrecy and deceit, official disobedience, health-care access, welfare reform, and environmental regulation and protection.



POL 3355 - Environmental Political Theory (ENVT)
(4.0 cr; fall, odd academic years)
An examination of political understandings of the relationship between humans and the natural environment. Topics include Western and non-Western perspectives on the natural environment, technological optimism and survivalism, the tragedy of the commons, environmental direct action movements, the environmental justice movement, and theories of green democracy and citizenship. Readings cover a variety of political perspectives and ideologies including neoconservatism, libertarianism, ecoanarchism, ecosocialism, ecofeminism, social ecology, deep ecology, and postmodernism.



POL 3401 - U.S. Foreign Policy (SS)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1201 or 1401 or #; spring, even academic years)
Institutions and processes of American foreign policy. Major factors to be considered and levels of analysis that allow for the examination and dissection of foreign policy decisions.



POL 3411 - International Law (E/CR)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1401 or #; spring, even academic years)
Relations of international law to individuals, states, the international community, jurisdictional problems, survey of principles developed by diplomatic agents and consuls, treaties, arbitration, treatment of aliens, pacific settlement. War, military occupation, war crimes, neutrality.



POL 3453 - Russian Politics and Foreign Policy (IP)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1401, 2001 or #; no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 4453; spring, odd academic years)
Domestic and foreign policies of Russian and the former Soviet Union from the Bolshevik Revolution to the present. Nature of the Soviet empire, Russian Federalism, democratic and market reforms, Russian foreign relations, and diplomatic style.



POL 3461 - Diplomatic Negotiation (IP)
(4.0 cr; summer, every year)
This course focuses on the art of diplomatic negotiation. The course consists of three components: (1) the theory and practice of diplomatic negotiation; (2) negotiating styles; and (3) simulation of diplomatic negotiations (bilateral and multilateral negotiations, international conference, summitry, and mediation). This course is unique in that it is devoted to simulations/mock conferences. Students gain first-hand knowledge and skills of negotiation through simulation.



POL 3475 - International Human Rights (IP)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1401 or #; spring, odd academic years)
Explores the historical and philosophical development of concepts of human rights and the contemporary international political and legal frameworks to address rights. Analyzes contemporary concerns about political, economic, and social rights, as well as specific human rights topics like human trafficking and war crimes. Compares American, European, Asian, and Developing World conceptions and critiques of human rights.



POL 3501 - Government and Politics of Asia (SS)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1101 or 1201 or 1401 or #; fall, odd academic years)
Examination of governments, political and leadership changes, and economic developments in China, Japan, and Korea. Modernization, democratization, political pluralism, revolution, authoritarianism, and civil-military relations.



POL 3503 - Women in Politics Worldwide (IP)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1201 or #; spring, odd academic years)
Examines the ways gender influences politics throughout the world. Topics covered include: the "gender gap" and voter turnout, women's involvement in linkage organizations, such as parties and interest groups, and finally policy outcomes regarding women in different kinds of political systems.



POL 3504 - Latin American Politics (IP)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1401 or #; spring, even academic years)
A comparative examination of central issues in and components of Latin American political life, with a particular focus on economic development, political development of democratic regimes, political violence and human rights, and the region's role in the world. Countries analyzed may include Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, El Salvador, Mexico, Peru, and Cuba.



POL 3514 - Pyramids and Politics on the Nile (IP)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-#; summer, offered periodically)
Four-week study-abroad course on Egyptian political history with an emphasis on the environmental challenges of the Nile River Valley. Guided excursions, guest speakers, and individual exploration at significant political, historical, and cultural sites in the Cairo area and along the Nile Valley from Aswan to Alexandria.



POL 3993 - Directed Study
(1.0 - 5.0 cr [max 10.0 cr]; Prereq-approved directed study form; fall, spring, every year)
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.



POL 3996 - Field Study in Political Science
(1.0 - 16.0 cr [max 16.0 cr]; Prereq-#; max of 4 cr may be applied to the major or minor; fall, spring, every year)
Field study of governmental organization; internship with legislature, a state or local administrative office, lobbying group, or other position involving direct experience with government, governmental officials, or political organizations and environment.



POL 4251 - Political Participation and Voting Behavior (SS)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1201 or #; fall, even academic years)
A broad overview of factors influencing the political behavior of groups and individuals both within and outside institutions. Particular emphasis on examining issues such as voter turnout, economic influences on voting patterns, and social movement mobilization.



POL 4266 - Media and Politics
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1201, 2001 or #; spring, odd academic years)
Relationships between mass media, government, and public in American Democracy. Democratic theory and media/press, role of informed citizenry in theories of U.S. democracy, role of media in informing the U.S. citizenry. Ways media influences public opinion, relationship of media, public opinion, and elites in politics.



POL 4301 - Contemporary Political Thought (HUM)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1101, 2001 or #; fall, odd academic years)
A survey of social and political thought in the 20th and 21st centuries.



POL 4302 - International Comparative Political Theory (IP)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1101, 2001 or #; fall, even academic years)
Examination of international political thought beyond the canon of Western political theory. Topics include modernity, democracy, legitimacy, justice, nonviolence, and nationalism, with an emphasis on the Islamic world, the Indian subcontinent, sub-Saharan Africa, and East Asia.



POL 4451 - Comparative Foreign Policy
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1401, 2001 or #; fall, even academic years)
Comparative examinations of foreign policies of selected countries, i.e., the United States, China, the two Koreas, and Japan. U.S. foreign policy toward Northeast Asia, the triangular relationship between Washington, Beijing, and Moscow; China's rise, North Korea's future, and Japan-U.S. military alliance.



POL 4452 - International Relations
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1401, 2001 or #; fall, odd academic years)
Theory and practice of contemporary international relations. Realism and idealism, national power, systems theory, integration theory, war and peace, conflict resolution, and the world government.



POL 4905 - Senior Research Seminar in Political Science
(2.0 cr; Prereq-2001, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, at least one Pol 4XXX course; fall, spring, every year)
Guided research in political science. Requires the refinement and expansion of a research paper students previously completed in a 4000-level political science course. The end result of this revision and expansion is an original, significant research paper of a substantial length. Also requires that the student make an oral presentation of the final work to the discipline faculty and graduating seniors. With faculty approval, the student may produce such a paper based on a research paper previously completed in a 3000-level political science course.



POL 4993 - Directed Study
(1.0 - 5.0 cr [max 10.0 cr]; Prereq-approved directed study form; fall, spring, every year)
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.



 
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