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AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES (AMIN)
College of Liberal Arts
American Indian Studies
 
AMIN 504 - Minnesota Tribal-State Relations: History, Law, Conflict and Conflict Resolution
(0.0 cr; S-N or Aud, summer, every year)
This course will explore the relationship between Indian tribes in Minnesota and the state government. It will first provide a brief history of federal Indian policy from colonization through the present day with a focus on tribal-state relations. Second, it will provide the legal background (regulatory, civil and criminal) between tribes and states generally and Minnesota tribes specifically. Third, it will provide a brief history of the eleven Minnesota tribes and Minnesota treaties and statutes. Fourth, it will provide an overview of issues in which tribal and state jurisdiction may conflict. Fifth, it will provide new methods for resolving conflicts and the future of tribal-state agreements. Each of these will be presented in five three hour presentations.



AMIN 1001 - Introduction to American Indian Studies (CDIVERSITY)
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, every year)
This course serves non-majors, majors, and minors, introducing them to the history, methodologies, and community-oriented aspirations of American Indian studies. Students will collaboratively explore texts, topics, intellectuals, and issues crucial to the field, thereby preparing themselves and one another to be ethically-engaged residents of the Anishinaabe lands in which our campus is situated, and to excel in other courses both within and well-beyond UMD's AMIN curriculum.



AMIN 1010 - American Indian Experience to 1900 (CDIVERSITY, LE CAT7, LECD CAT07)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-Credit will not be granted if already received for 1110.; A-F or Aud, fall, every year)
Introduction to the social, economic, political, and cultural changes and continuities of American Indian life up to 1900. Native-European encounters, the formation of the United States, and the establishments of hundred of treaties between the federal government and Native nations has continued relevance for both Native peoples and Americans today. Students will critically interrogate how we interpret the past and how these narratives shape and inform the present.



AMIN 1020 - American Indian Experiences: 1900-present (HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY, LE CAT7, LECD CAT07)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-Credit will not be granted if already received for 1120.; A-F only, spring, every year)
Through a chronological and biographical approach, the social, economic, political, and cultural changes and continuities of American Indian life from 1900 to the present will be introduced. Significant changes experienced by American Indians as well as their ability to adapt, resist, and thrive will be analyzed.



AMIN 1103 - Introduction to the Ojibwe Language (COMM & LAN, LE CAT3, LECD CAT03)
(3.0 cr; A-F only, fall, every year)
Speaking and comprehension of basic Ojibwe speech patterns. Development of rudimentary reading knowledge.



AMIN 1104 - Beginning Ojibwe II (COMM & LAN, LE CAT3, LECD CAT03)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-1103 or instructor consent; A-F only, spring, every year)
Speaking and comprehension of basic Ojibwe speech patterns. Development of rudimentary reading knowledge.



AMIN 1204 - Minnesota Tribal-State Relations: History, Law, Conflict and Conflict Resolution
(1.0 cr; A-F or Aud, summer, every year)
This course will explore the relationship between Indian tribes in Minnesota and the state government. It will first provide a brief history of federal Indian policy from colonization through the present day with a focus on tribal-state relations. Second, it will provide the legal background (regulatory, civil and criminal) between tribes and states generally and Minnesota tribes specifically. Third, it will provide a brief history of the eleven Minnesota tribes and Minnesota treaties and statues. Fourth, it will provide an overview of issues in which tribal and state jurisdiction may conflict. Fifth, it will provide new methods for resolving conflicts and the future of tribal-state agreements. Each of these will be presented in five three hour presentations.



AMIN 1606 - Introduction to American Indian Literature (HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY, LE CAT9)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-Credit will not be granted if already received for 1106.; A-F only, fall, summer, offered periodically)
Introduces American Indian literatures from a variety of tribal perspectives as well as a wide range of genres including oratory, poetry, short stories, and novels. The major tropes and significant theories of American Indian literature will be covered.



AMIN 2015 - Ojibwe History and Culture (CDIVERSITY)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-Credit will not be granted if already received for 2115.; A-F only, spring, offered periodically)
Anishinabe, Ojibwe, and Chippewa. Origins and lifestyle; relationship between traditional and contemporary times. Emphasis on Minnesota.



AMIN 2103 - Intermediate Ojibwe I (COMM & LAN, LE CAT3, LECD CAT03)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-1104 or instructor consent; credit will not be granted if already received for 2203.; A-F only, fall, every year)
Speaking basic Ojibwe sentences and paragraphs at fluent level so listener can understand speaking pattern context. Ability to write and read Ojibwe language proficiently.



AMIN 2104 - Intermediate Ojibwe II (COMM & LAN, LE CAT3, LECD CAT03)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-2103 or instructor consent; credit will not be granted if already received for 2204.; A-F only, spring, every year)
Speaking basic Ojibwe sentences and paragraphs at fluent level so listener can understand speaking pattern context. Ability to write and read Ojibwe language proficiently.



AMIN 2210 - American Indian Politics: Law, Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights (SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY, LE CAT6)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-Credit will not be granted if already received for 2110.; fall, even academic years)
Introduces critical terms and issues facing American Indian nations in their relationships with federal and state governments as well as their own conceptions of nationhood and law by critically analyzing the principal actors and discussing the roles national mythologies, media, identity, and activism play in law and policy formation.



AMIN 2405 - American Indian Families and Society (SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY, LE CAT8)
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, every year)
Indigenous North American families before European contact; impact of contact, events and governmental policies upon family structure and survival: Native parenting past and present; current issues for American Indian families.



AMIN 2407 - Boarding Schools and Beyond: A History of American Indian Education (CDIVERSITY, LE CAT8, LECD CAT08)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-Credit will not be granted if already received for 2707.; fall, odd academic years)
Explores the diverse experiences American Indians have had in the U.S. educational system from federal boarding schools to contemporary public schools and tribal colleges. Students will be exposed to rhetorical and political aspects of education.



AMIN 2605 - Survey of American Indian Arts (FINE ARTS, CDIVERSITY, LE CAT9)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-Credit will not be granted if already received for 2105.; A-F only, fall, spring, offered periodically)
Traditional arts of American Indians and the cultures that produced them; techniques, motifs, and aesthetics of Indian textiles and utilitarian and ceremonial arts.



AMIN 3206 - Federal Indian Policy (SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY, LE CAT8, LECD CAT08)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-minimum 30 credits; this course previously titled: Indian-White Relations; credit will not be granted if already received for 3106.; A-F only, fall, spring, offered periodically)
Examination of the formulation, implementation, evolution, and comparison of Indian policy from pre-colonial to self-governance. Introduces students to the theoretical approaches structuring research of federal Indian policy, views, and attitudes of the policy-makers and reaction of indigenous nations. Discussion of the policies and the impact related to those policies.



AMIN 3230 - American Indian Tribal Government and Law (SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-minimum 30 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for 3550.; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, offered periodically)
American Indian tribal governments and leadership, historically and today, have aimed at the promotion and protection of the nation, overseen domestic and foreign affairs, and provided for the basic needs and desires of their citizens. This course provides students a general background of the history, development, structure, and politics associated with indigenous governments, analyzing how these institutions have been modified to meet ever-changing internal needs and external pressures.



AMIN 3393 - Projects in American Indian Studies
(1.0 - 5.0 cr [max 10.0 cr]; Prereq-1020, 1120, minimum 30 credits, instructor consent; maximum 10 credits between AMIN 3300 and 3393; A-F only, fall, spring, summer, every year)
Directed reading, research, or involvement in social action culminating in the preparation of a paper.



AMIN 3410 - Fur Trade in Canada and the United States (CDIVERSITY)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-minimum 30 credits; A-F only, fall, offered periodically)
Historical review and analysis of Canadian and U.S. Indians in the fur trades.



AMIN 3420 - American Indians in Sports (CDIVERSITY, LE CAT7, LECD CAT07)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-30 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for 3110.; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, even academic years)
The role of sports and games in Native tradition and tribal sovereignty; development of individual and tribal self-determination; indigenous and adapted games and sports integration of tribal epistemologies into sports; Native sports figures and leaders; history of Native sports pre-Contact through the present.



AMIN 3430 - Global Indigenous Studies (GLOBAL PER)
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, summer, offered periodically)
This course fosters a consideration of the planet's indigenous peoples, emphasizing their various and varying cultural, territorial, political, social, legal, aesthetic, economic, and intellectual contributions and claims. Exploring indigenous peoples' relationships with one another, with settler governments, with non-governmental organizations, and with supranational institutions, students in the course will develop a broad understanding of the increasingly global trajectories of indigenous studies.



AMIN 3450 - American Indian Women (CDIVERSITY)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-minimum 30 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for 3250.; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, odd academic years)
American Indian women in tribal societies before and after European contact; Indian women as stewards of knowledge, tradition, and society; impact of colonization; traditional and contemporary female leadership.



AMIN 3460 - American Indian Psychology
(3.0 cr; Prereq-Intro soc sci course, 1020, 3206 or instructor consent; credit will not be granted if already received for 3750.; A-F only, fall, odd academic years)
Reviews major theories of personality development and motivational psychology applicable to American Indian issues. Attributes of culturally appropriate developmental models are advanced through cross-cultural examination of general traits, perspectives, norms, and values. Relevant techniques of counseling.



AMIN 3620 - Ojibwe Literatures: Sovereignty and Survivance (CDIVERSITY)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-1106, 1606; 30 credits; Credit will not be granted if already received for 3520.; A-F or Aud, fall, even academic years)
Study of a selection of Ojibwe literatures from the 1800s to the present including traditional stories, poetry, political/activist writings, journalism, novels and short stories. Works will reflect the diversity, resistance, adaptation, and survivance of Ojibwe people.



AMIN 3660 - American Indian Novel (HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-1020, 1120 or instructor consent; 30 credits; Credit will not be granted if already received for 3260.; A-F only, spring, offered periodically)
Approximately four novels by American Indian authors are read with an explanation of the novels and the milieu that produced them.



AMIN 3995 - Special Topics: (Various Title to be Assigned)
(3.0 cr [max 12.0 cr]; Prereq-minimum 30 credits; A-F only, fall, spring, offered periodically)
Study of topics not included in regular curriculum.



AMIN 3997 - Internship in American Indian Studies
(4.0 - 8.0 cr [max 12.0 cr]; Prereq-AmIn major, 60 credits or instructor consent; A-F only, fall, spring, summer, every year)
Supervised lab experience in American Indian agency or project or with significant Indian clientele. Advance, concurrent, and follow-up written and oral presentations.



AMIN 4191 - Senior Study of Ojibwe Language
(1.0 - 6.0 cr [max 12.0 cr]; Prereq-1103, instructor consent; no grad credit; a total of 12 credits may be taken between AMIN 4191 and AMIN 4302; A-F only, fall, spring, summer, every year)
Individual opportunity to devise and/or be involved in programs to increase fluency.



AMIN 4230 - Introduction to Federal Indian Law (SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-minimum 60 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for AMIN 3333; no grad credit; A-F only, fall, spring, offered periodically)
Federal Indian law has had a profound effect on our lives, liberties, and properties of indigenous peoples. At times, U.S. policy and Supreme Court ruling shave worked to protect aboriginal rights, while at other times they have had devastating consequences. This course examines the role of the U.S. Supreme Court as a policy-making institution in their dealings with Indigenous nations, requiring us to ask about the origins of federal judicial power and their application indigenous peoples.



AMIN 4250 - American Indian Diplomacy: Treaties, Compacts, and Agreements (GLOBAL PER)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-minimum 60 credits, no grad credit; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, offered periodically)
Indigenous Nations have long engaged in diplomatic arrangements with one another, foreign nations, colonial/state governments, and the United States. Such political engagements affirm the inherent sovereignty of First Nations, recognizing the distinctive rights and power unique to Native peoples and were used to forge friendships, end wars, cede lands and resources, create reservations, and reserve hunting and fishing rights. This course examines the history of First Nations treaty making, the legal and political status of Indian treaties and agreement, the ambiguities and problems in indigenous-state diplomacy and treaty litigation.



AMIN 4630 - American Indians and the Media (HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-minimum 60 credits; no grad credit; A-F only, fall, spring, offered periodically)
Examination of Native controlled and non-Native images of American Indians in varied media including journalism, television, and advertising from the times of European contact to the present. Explorations and comparisons of historic images with the contemporary. Students will participate in a hands-on media watch research project.



AMIN 4640 - American Indians in the Movies (HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-60 credits; no grad cr; A-F or Aud, fall, every year)
Indian Country at the beginning of the film era; government Indian policies during the film era; silent film; war and romance; westerns; Indian and White heroes and heroines; stereotypes; modern Native-made film.



AMIN 4990 - Directed Research
(1.0 - 6.0 cr [max 12.0 cr]; Prereq-60 credits and instructor consent, max 8 credits to grad program; A-F only, fall, spring, summer, every year)
Qualified seniors and graduate students may register for work on tutorial basis in research of an advanced nature in American Indian Studies.



 
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